Planning during the pandemic

Estate Planning During the Pandemic

We’re still doing estate planning in the pandemic. In this podcast episode, we discuss the kinds of issues clients are asking about, and what steps we encourage people to take. What is the single most important document for you to get in order now? (Spoiler alert: we think it’s your health care power of attorney.)…

Tom's Retirement

Tom’s Retirement

Tom’s retirement. What does an estate planning lawyer learn from advising others about his own retirement planning? Tom Curti, founding partner of Fleming & Curti, PLC, retired just one year ago. At the time Tom was a 44-year lawyer. The Fleming & Curti partnership had been in place for more than a quarter century. For…

Agents who become incapable

Agents Who Become Incapable

You completed your estate planning, signing a will, and maybe even a trust. At the same time you signed a durable financial power of attorney, and a health care power of attorney. You planned for the possibility that you become incapacitated or die. But what happens about agents who become incapable of handling your affairs…

Marijuana and your estate plan

Marijuana and Your Estate Plan

Wait a minute — marijuana is illegal, isn’t it? Why would it factor into your estate plan? Join us for an engaging podcast discussion with our friend Gerry Beyer. Professor Beyer teaches law at the Texas Tech University College of Law. He is a national authority on a number of topics — but especially on,…

Gun trusts

Gun Trusts: Do You Need One?

We occasionally get asked about “gun trusts.” Does everyone who owns a firearm need to think about setting up a gun trust? Or is this something only gun dealers need to worry about? For most casual firearm owners, there’s no need to worry about a separate trust to handle guns. But join us for our…

Springing vs. Surviving Power of Attorney

Springing vs. Surviving Power of Attorney

Springing vs. surviving durable financial powers of attorney: what’s the difference? Which is better? A “springing” power of attorney becomes effective only when the signer becomes incapacitated — lawyers talk about it “springing” into existence. A “surviving” power is immediately effective, and survives even if the signer later becomes incapacitated. Which do you prefer? Join…

Pet Trusts

Pet Trusts – With Prof. Gerry Beyer

We’re lucky to count Prof. Gerry Beyer among our good friends. He’s the Governor Preston E. Smith Regents Professor of Law at Texas Tech University College of Law. You can imagine that his business cards must be larger than usual — and that’s before he even gets to his academic credentials, accolades and identifiers. Prof.…

Simplify your estate plan

Simplify Your Estate Plan

Everyone wants a “simple” estate plan. But many have complicated notions about distribution of assets. We want to help you simplify your estate plan. We see many clients with fixed ideas about which assets should go to which beneficiaries. Do you have four children? Well, couldn’t you just open four accounts at different financial institutions…

Electronic wills in the era of coronavirus

Electronic Wills in the Era of Coronavirus

Arizona is one of the forward-thinking states authorizing some sort of electronic signing of wills. So what is the status of electronic wills in the era of coronavirus concerns? Turns out it’s not yet ready for the real world. Arizona (and most of the other states at the forefront) still requires witnesses to be physically…